Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

20 Pages «<1011121314>»
Up-grading the Del Prado 1/100 Victory Options
Gandale
#221 Posted : 02 July 2013 23:24:02

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionMember of the Year award: Member of the Year award
Groups: Tech Support, registriert, Registered

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 4,974
Points: 14,982
Location: Aberdeen
My, good at graphics too....Cool Cool .. are there no limits to your talents Robin....LOL LOL .. Lovely work as usual.... Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
Diary Index - (SOTS) - http://forum.model-space...;m=58478&#post58478
Present Build
HMS SOTS - Mantua's RMS Titanic - San Francisco II
Subscribed to
HMS Vic - Santísima Trinidad - HMS Hood - Cutty Sark - Yamato

http://www.model-space.com/gb/
Hans
#222 Posted : 03 July 2013 07:48:32

Rank: Superelite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 posts
Groups: Registered, registriert

Joined: 30/03/2011
Posts: 1,042
Points: 3,132
Location: Bryanston, Johannesburg. RSA
Lovely stuff Robin,Love it's all these pieces that will help with a scratch build one day!!BigGrin
Rgds, Hans
"It's okay to make mistakes. mistakes are our teachers - they help us to to learn, even if it is painfully"
Current Build: HMS Victory
Under the bench: HMS Victory Cross Section, Endeavour, Endeavour Cross section, Sovereign of the Seas, Akagi and now The Black Pearl!
Plymouth57
#223 Posted : 04 July 2013 20:29:46

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: New Members

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 970
Points: 2,914
Location: Plympton
Thanks Alan and Hans!
Doing the pretty graphics is quite a relaxing diversion when I want to get the sawdust out of my sinuses, glad you like them too! I suppose when you come down to it, unless a kit provides a nearly finished component instead of a pile of wooden planks or dowels, what we are all building is virtually scratch built! I'm sort of scratch building on top of the scratch building! BigGrin

Finally finished the main part of the Bowsprit so here she is! Mellow

Ok then, here’s the full story of the Bowsprit!
First of all, a mention of the parts supplied by the DelPrado kit. According to the instructions, the Bowsprit is composed of three pieces of dowel, the main Bowsprit of 8mm diameter, the Jib Boom of 6mm and the Flying Jib Boom of 4mm. The Jib Boom is connected to the Bowsprit by a two-piece plywood cap whilst the Jib and Flying Jib are joined together by a single plywood ‘figure of eight’. We also have the instructions to make the spritsail yard and the spritsail topsail yard but I won’t bother with them yet, they’ll keep until I’m into the main yards etc.
Checking the dimensions in the McKay Victory book, the Bowsprit was 2ft 5 ins in diameter which scales down to 8.6mm in 1/100 (note the effortless switch from feet to metres! Great until I forget which one I’m working in!) So in actual fact the Bowsprit is slightly under sized but not really noticeable. As for the other two however, the 6mm Jib Boom (1ft 5 and 3/8 ins in real life) reduces down to not 6mm but 3.8mm! The Flying Jib Boom ( 7 and 5/8 ins) comes down to 1.9mm in diameter, NOT the 4mm as supplied! This would mean a complete scratch build using kit dowels meant for other parts of the build, ah well! Sort that out when I come to it!
The Bowsprit was made from the supplied wood therefore, (quite some time ago now,) but instead of a simple straight dowel it was tapered down slightly on the mini lathe reducing by about a mm over the length. The re-enforcing iron bands were cut out of lead strip and superglued into position after the fore and aft ends were cut to shape, the front to take the cap and bees and the rear to fit into the bow itself. After that, the little stubby bits that the later rigging goes in between were added along with the sheave blocks on either side which sit under the angled ‘wings’ called the Bees (No idea why!) The sheave blocks were filed out with a groove on the inside to take rigging lines and the Bees were also filed out to match up with them. Note! The sheave blocks are NOT symmetrical! The port one is set back further than the starboard. (Photos 7 and 8, ((8 and 9 might be missing their numbers!)) Also note the horizontal hole in the end of the Jib which simulates the sheave block of the original
A new Bowsprit Cap was formed from two layers of plywood, ( Photo 1) the kit version was about half as thick again as it should have been! Rather than having two holes in the ply and setting the Bowsprit dowel into the bigger one, I took a different route and drilled out the end of the Bowsprit to take a good old cocktail stick, (one of the very few in the UK that escaped Gandale’s clutches!!)LOL (Photo 2). The Cap then fitted over the stick (very tightly) and was PVA’d in place. (Photo 3) Once dry, the cocktail stick was cut off flush and sanded smooth. The hole for the Jib Boom was drilled using a very similar method to the earlier hawse holes using, for the most part, hand held drill bits in the pin vice, this was the easiest way to ensure that the hole went through at the correct angle to feed the boom through afterwards as seen in Photos 8 and 9.
Work then began on the Jib Boom and Flying Jib Boom. Instead of the kit 6mm and 4mm dowels, I used 4mm for the Jib and 2mm for the Flying, each one being tapered on the lathe again. Both booms are circular for nearly all their length but octagonal at the aft ends, the Jib is also shaped the same at the fore end, the Flying merely ends in a grooved ‘cap’ The two Photos on the lathe (4 and 5) shows the creation of the Jib octagon. The boom was tapered up to the section marked ‘A’, once that was done ‘A’ was itself reduced down to the same diameter and then filed into the octagon by filing a flat into four sides and then filing the four edges between those flats creating the eight sides. This was done with the wood still fixed into the lathe chuck, the dowel is much easier to control that way and doesn’t roll around as it would on the workbench. The almost finished result of the fore end of the Jib is seen in Photo 6.
The final addition to the Bowsprit Cap was to cut and fix the downward pointing boom commonly known as a ‘Dolphin Striker’ (that’s a Hell of a high jump for any dolphin!!) This boom is equipped with four holes drilled fore and aft at its lower end, which will eventually take four lines of standing rigging. I did try to make the first three examples from cocktail sticks but they just kept splitting after the second or third drilled holes so I needed another solution. Remember that little tool with the glued on sandpaper I made to smooth out the hawse-holes? Well the wooden handle it’s got is considerably shorter now! The ex-handle Dolphin Striker was chamfered at the top to fit under the Jib Boom and superglued into place. Once firm, the three retaining iron brackets were fashioned from the lead strip and glued on (Photo 3) Note also the small groove which holds the end of the Flying Jib Boom, on the kit instructions, the oversized Flying Jib didn’t actually extend back to the Cap at all.
The final set of Photos (which were numbered 10 and 11 but now apparently aren’t?) shows the design of the iron bracket, which holds the Jib and Flying Jib Booms together. The one in the photo is actually a quick second copy just to illustrate the procedure, I’d already fitted and painted the real one so couldn’t photograph it very well! The Jib is the larger dowel which has been filed to the octagon and then fitted with a superglued lead band as has the round dowel for the Flying Jib beside it. Before joining them together by drilling a small hole into each and fitting a little brass rod in between, the Jib band was lightly gripped in the long nosed pliers seen above, gripping the flat of the octagon on all four opposite sides turns the round band into an octagonal one as per the original. Compare the size of this tiny bracket which IS to scale with the plywood figure of eight which is the same fitting as supplied in the kit! Sheesh!
Finally the last photo shows the completed Bowsprit in all its pokey out glory. The first section up to the Cap will shortly be glued into the bow, the Jibs are, at this point still removable, I really don’t want over a foot of thin dowel sticking out the front until I’m ready to add all the spars and ropes at the same time! The Jibs still need another coat of Admiralty Wood (Walnut) to finish them off but I must admit that colour goes together really well with the Yellow Ochre and Black which bodes well for the future! (Incidentally, in the final photo the Jib isn’t fitting flush with the Bowsprit, it’s own weight with the Flying Jib is tipping it down slightly, the tips will raise up a little when the Jib is fitted on permanently. I've seen some old photos of the real Victory and the sheer weight and length of those jibs makes them look more like a giant longbow than a dead straight model bowsprit!
All in all, quite a lot of work involved but compared with the original kit appearance, well worth the extra effort. And I’ll have to do all this and much more on the three masts too!!Crying

Happy Building to AllFlapper

Robin

Update! all the photo numbers have come back! Confused
Double Update! I think I know where those numbers went now. I habitually print off the photo pages to use as a guide when composing the text, to save paper I printed all three pic pages on one sheet, the MS print thingy re-sized the pages to fit all three on and cut off the numbers in the process!Blushing Uppity computers!!
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Bowsprit Part 1 pic.JPG
The Bowsprit Part 2 pic.JPG
The Bowsprit Part 3 pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#224 Posted : 04 July 2013 22:01:49

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionMember of the Year award: Member of the Year award
Groups: Tech Support, registriert, Registered

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 4,974
Points: 14,982
Location: Aberdeen
Hi Robin, another high end description of your work and once again with superb results.. So much detail to take in I had to read it all a few times to fully appreciate the work and effort you have put in.... Cool Cool .. Excellent work and I have to be honest by saying I wondered where that last cocktail stick had got to....LOL LOL LOL .. Am so pleased to see it has been put to good use and found a lovely home.....LOL LOL

Regards

Alan
Diary Index - (SOTS) - http://forum.model-space...;m=58478&#post58478
Present Build
HMS SOTS - Mantua's RMS Titanic - San Francisco II
Subscribed to
HMS Vic - Santísima Trinidad - HMS Hood - Cutty Sark - Yamato

http://www.model-space.com/gb/
sparks
#225 Posted : 06 July 2013 14:39:59

Rank: Vicemaster


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: New Members

Joined: 01/04/2013
Posts: 312
Points: 939
Location: Essex
Nice work Robin ThumpUp
I was also aware of the discrepancy in the Del Prado mast and spar sizes and made a whole new set some time back, ready for fitting when eventually LOL needed.
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Admiral Anti Spiral
#226 Posted : 13 July 2013 10:53:46

Rank: Master

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service Medal
Groups: New Members

Joined: 24/09/2012
Posts: 504
Points: 1,502
Location: London
lovely work Robin, you're making this model into a master piece! i remember changing the bowsprit on this model to match how it is in reality and it was kind of fun but hard to get all the rigging right by looking at photos aloneBigGrin keep up the good work!
Processing - Progressing

Previous builds: HMS Victory
Current build: HMS Sovereign of the seas
Plymouth57
#227 Posted : 13 July 2013 17:39:50

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: New Members

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 970
Points: 2,914
Location: Plympton
Many thanks to all the above for their kind comments and also to all those looking in (and pushing the views counter up and up!)Blushing
I know what you mean about that rigging Admiral! Work has slowed down considerably at the moment, not because there isn't tons to get on with, simply because of the location of my workroom. As some of you might have seen in the thread where we were describing our 'dockyards', mine is situated up in my attic. This means it's ruddy cold in the winter, but a fan heater sorts that out, it's the summer time that gets very uncomfortable, especially in a heatwave situation as we are in now (officially designated heatwave on the BBC weather forecast today!Tongue )
Mornings not too bad but after midday it's between 85 and 90 degrees until sunset up there! It used to be much worse until I had a skylight fitted which gives lovely light and a degree of ventilation, but even with a fan going full blast you can't work on anything without your hands going sweaty and sticky within minutes which is not very good when handling small bits of wood or rigging thread!!Crying
I hope to put up a few pics soon, I'm trying to rectify a mistake I made months ago when I carved the knightsheads for the bow. Made them really nice, drilled out the bottom and added a brass rod for strength then drilled the bow and glued them in. They've been there for many months now and looked fine until I finally fitted the bowsprit a couple of weeks ago. Then, as I was checking the rigging diagrams I realised that I'd forgotten to drill out the slanting holes for the main mast stays to pass through!Blushing

I tried to drill out the holes in situ but with the bowsprit and the beakhead timbers blocking easy access even to the pin vice, the result was far from pleasant to put it mildly! One hole was just about useable but the other went through completly off line, it was slanting all right, just not in the right direction! Only one solution at this stage, snap!, snap!, time to make two new knightsheads!
This I've now done, complete with properly aligned holes, a quick check in the McGowan book and lo and behold, they've got three iron rings set into the front face below the stay rope holes. A look through my brass spares collection for ring bolts confirmed that the only ones I had left over from the Grimsby additions were too big for this scale so scratch built ones it would have to be. I used the same 0.5mm brass wire looped around a clamped drill bit (just like making the rings for the cannon tackle) and then soldered the end of the 'ring' back to the 'pin' part after they were cut to length. They don't look too bad at all once drilled and glued into the posts.
I'm now going to make up a simple jig with the knightshead stuck into a drilled hole with a length of bamboo kebab skewer (unused I might add!BigGrin ) a couple of inches away to act as an anchor for the block and tackle which attaches to those iron rings. I'm going to add that on before I glue the knightsheads back on the bow and then, like Sparks, make up the rigging with the hearts etc which pass through the knights and the Marine's Walk, it'll be easier than doing it in position later!
The problem I have now is that even with the McKay and McGowan books, I don't have a clear diagram of where those knightshead block and tackles actually go to! They start at the knights and obviously head up the bowsprit but to where I'll have to find out later. It shouldn't be a problem until the fore and main masts are in and the rest of the jib boom and flying jib go on to meet them - months away yet (maybe years if this heatwave doesn't ease off soon!)Cursing

Back with those pics soon.

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#228 Posted : 13 July 2013 22:17:47

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionMember of the Year award: Member of the Year award
Groups: Tech Support, registriert, Registered

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 4,974
Points: 14,982
Location: Aberdeen
Look forward to your return with this upgrade... can't really say I want the heatwave to end as we haven't seen much of it yet....lol....

Regards

Alan

Diary Index - (SOTS) - http://forum.model-space...;m=58478&#post58478
Present Build
HMS SOTS - Mantua's RMS Titanic - San Francisco II
Subscribed to
HMS Vic - Santísima Trinidad - HMS Hood - Cutty Sark - Yamato

http://www.model-space.com/gb/
sparks
#229 Posted : 14 July 2013 16:05:34

Rank: Vicemaster


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: New Members

Joined: 01/04/2013
Posts: 312
Points: 939
Location: Essex
Plymouth57 wrote:
Many thanks to all the above for their kind comments and also to all those looking in (and pushing the views counter up and up!)Blushing
I know what you mean about that rigging Admiral! Work has slowed down considerably at the moment, not because there isn't tons to get on with, simply because of the location of my workroom. As some of you might have seen in the thread where we were describing our 'dockyards', mine is situated up in my attic. This means it's ruddy cold in the winter, but a fan heater sorts that out, it's the summer time that gets very uncomfortable, especially in a heatwave situation as we are in now (officially designated heatwave on the BBC weather forecast today!Tongue )
Mornings not too bad but after midday it's between 85 and 90 degrees until sunset up there! It used to be much worse until I had a skylight fitted which gives lovely light and a degree of ventilation, but even with a fan going full blast you can't work on anything without your hands going sweaty and sticky within minutes which is not very good when handling small bits of wood or rigging thread!!Crying
Robin


I know how you feel Robin, my office/ hide hole BigGrin is in the loft and I can't go anywhere near it in this sort of weather, I've always had a Velux roof window, but even with that open the temperature is in the 30's C, not a good place to be when you're trying to work out an invoice!
I even fitted a split AC system up there and that does reduce the temperature to something bearable in about 30mins, but the cost of running it on a regular basis is astronomical Blink so it only gets used in emergencies.
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Plymouth57
#230 Posted : 16 July 2013 16:46:32

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: New Members

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 970
Points: 2,914
Location: Plympton
Hi All, just a quickie update on the Knightsheads before I sink back down the ladder into the cooler (sort of) conditions below!
Hey Sparks, it's really strange just how similar our builds are, not only similar upgrades but you are building yours in the oven as well! BigGrin

I have now completed one half of the replacement Knightsheads, at least, both of the actual 'posts' are completed, I just have to do a second set of block and tackle.
I forgot to print off the photo pages so this is from memory, (actually a couple of the inkjets have dried up again with the heat and there's nothing worse than a stripey photo page!)
The first big pic is just a re-cap of the work done ages ago to bring the bow up to scratch, (that reminds me, first hint, DON'T reach over the bow whilst still holding any sharp pointed tools!) To date, the not very good bulkhead kit decoration was replaced with scratch built wooden pillars and curved brass rod arches. This was followed with proper bulkhead doors and gun port lids (not present in the kit). Another missing section was the bow crews toilets which were carved out of wood and the kit provided Marine's Walk support (plywood) was replaced with two separate square sectioned brass rod, carefully bent into the correct shape and epoxied into place resting on the kit's curved head timber (metal component). As mentioned in the photo text, the starboard one later came off but I'm actually quite glad of that as it gives me more room to manoeuvre around with the rigging!BigGrin
Finally, the kit plastic mesh was replaced with more authentic wooden grating and the head timbers were made up with a smaller sectioned square brass rod. (Note also the original Knightsheads which I spoilt trying to retrospectively drill them through in situ)
Ok, on to the new stuff. The Bowsprit bottom section has been glued in position. The first PVA attempt didn't go tight enough so I ran superglue down where the bowsprit rested on the prow timber below - much stronger! The Gammoning which secures the bowsprit to the bow has now been added with the rope binding which 'pinches' the gammoning in at it's waist also visible.
As well as the largish slanting holes for the main mast stay ropes, each Knightshead also requires a set of three iron rings in the front face to attach the tensioning tackle onto. The only commercial ('Constructo') eyebolts I had left were too big for this scale so I had to make some smaller ones up with .05mm brass wire using the same method as previously employed for the cannon block and tackle (see the bottom left photo, the Constructo version is the largest one in the picture).
Bottom right shows the smaller rings in place before painting with Admiralty Metal Black whilst the top right photo shows the first set of blocks tied onto those rings with dark brown thread for the ropes and natural thinner thread for the seizing. The blocks are the Constructo shop bought wooden ones, two singles at the top and a double at the bottom. The first thing I did was to gently thread the blocks onto a thin brass rod to hold them and then first painted them with a clear matt varnish to strengthen them a little. After that was dry I painted them in Admiralty Walnut (wood) and finally highlighted (or is that lowlighted) the grooves with Citadel black ink. I may well try that Admiralty Walnut stain when I have to order from CMB again, it might prove easier than two coats of paint! Painting (or staining them) to a darker wood effect improves the scale 'look' of these things, unfortunately there's a few hundred more of them to go now! On the other hand, if you could see those plastic 'things' that came with the kit!! Blink
The final big photo shows my simple little jig set up for attaching the block and tackle to the Knights. It is so much easier doing this before the things are glued onto the bow each side of the bowsprit, especially if you accidently cut through what you thought was the waste bit of thread and have to start again! Blushing
The dark threads tying the blocks on to the bamboo skewers are of course temporary, these will be removed when the Knights go on to be replaced with the full length of thread once I find out where the hell they go to!
So that's about it for now, I've got to do another set of block and tackle for the other side now and then fit up the rigging, hearts and other assorted gubbins which pass down through the Marine's Walk and those holes in the Knights, hopefully when it's cooler! My finger tips are now sticking to the damned keyboard so I'll see you all later!

Happy Building!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Knightsheads pic 1.JPG
The Knightsheads Pt2 pic2.JPG
Knightshead rigging jig pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
sparks
#231 Posted : 16 July 2013 19:46:53

Rank: Vicemaster


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: New Members

Joined: 01/04/2013
Posts: 312
Points: 939
Location: Essex
Very nice work Robin.
I remember the yellow plastic (oversized) blocks and deadeyes Crying
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Gandale
#232 Posted : 16 July 2013 21:56:19

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionMember of the Year award: Member of the Year award
Groups: Tech Support, registriert, Registered

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 4,974
Points: 14,982
Location: Aberdeen
Fabulous Robin, love following your renovation and of course your detailed description of the works..... Love Love .. Itching to see the next episode so keep the great work coming.... Cool Cool

Regards

Alan

Diary Index - (SOTS) - http://forum.model-space...;m=58478&#post58478
Present Build
HMS SOTS - Mantua's RMS Titanic - San Francisco II
Subscribed to
HMS Vic - Santísima Trinidad - HMS Hood - Cutty Sark - Yamato

http://www.model-space.com/gb/
Bernd
#233 Posted : 19 July 2013 21:55:18

Rank: Pro

Groups: Registered, registriert

Joined: 30/12/2011
Posts: 123
Points: 369
Location: Graz, Austria
Robin, thanks for this very impressive build diary!
Lots of details, great ideas and a very good description!
Best regards,
Bernd
Admiral Anti Spiral
#234 Posted : 19 July 2013 22:01:55

Rank: Master

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service Medal
Groups: New Members

Joined: 24/09/2012
Posts: 504
Points: 1,502
Location: London
wow lovely little jig idea, great work BigGrin Drool
Processing - Progressing

Previous builds: HMS Victory
Current build: HMS Sovereign of the seas
Plymouth57
#235 Posted : 25 July 2013 20:23:50

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: New Members

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 970
Points: 2,914
Location: Plympton
Many thanks to the Alans, Bernd and Admiral! I think once I start up into the masts and rigging there'll be a lot more little jigs on the way, it's so much easier to knock up the blocks and tackle off the actual model and then simply transfer them on to it once they're done. It can't be done for every bit by any means, but any ways to make it easier can't be bad!BigGrin

The bow is now proceeding at a rate of knots if you’ll forgive the pun! Blushing
The first job was to produce a set of six eye-bolts from the 0.5mm brass wire to make up the six that are found on the bow bulkhead just below the fence. These have to be drilled into the decorative strip as can be seen in photo 1, not the easiest job as the strip is hardly any wider than the drill bit used to make the holes! These are all now in place and will be painted with the Admiralty Metal Black fairly soon.
The second bit of ironmongery that was needed was the eye-bolt and corresponding ring which is located slap bang in the centre of the Marine’s Walk gangway. For this I again used the 0.5mm brass wire, but unlike all the previous rings and bolts I used my brand new roll of brass wire, which I’d just got direct from E-bay. It’s pretty damned good stuff too! A full 10 metres for around £3.50 or so, (just under a fiver with the p&p) so very good value. It’s not as soft a metal as my first lot which was either supplied with the DelPrado kit itself, or else was left over from the Bounty kit by the same manufacturer. Despite being stiffer, it will still bend around the drill bits to produce the bolts and rings and, even better, with a light sanding with a foam sanding pad it WILL accept the ‘Blacken-it’ chemical ‘converter’. All my other brass supplies simply won’t turn black! I suspect they have some form of protective lacquer which still seems to affect the process even after I’ve deliberately sanded it off. It will eventually go a dark grey/black but the finish is all lumpy and bits would fall off when it was handled or wiped dry.
As you can see in photo 2, it produces a lovely authentic ‘rusty iron’ effect, just what I was after in fact so from now on all the rings etc, to go into the deck for the rigging will be produced this way, and hopefully, the chainwale chains as well when I get there.
Before the Knightsheads could be glued down in place, there was something else which had to go onto the bow – namely the safety netting to stop the ‘rummys’ from falling overboard during their night time ablutions. The first step was to cut out a strip of stiff card, (I used an off cut from a Pound shop pack of inkjet photo paper!). The strip was slid in behind the head timbers and two marks made on the left side, these correspond to the height and width of the single toilet which sits alongside the curved roundhouse. Once that was cut out and the fit was nice and snug, the right hand side was marked to follow the curving head timber. The actual length of the inside of the timbers is a little misleading from the outside, hence the need to stick an extra piece of card on to the first attempt! Blushing Once satisfactory, the template was used to cut out the black nylon netting as seen in the same photo. This was the stiffer of the two types of netting that I got for mere pennies from the Plymouth Pannier Market.
Photo 5 shows the cut out section of netting with the supporting rope of 0.3mm rigging thread which has been woven through the top row of ‘complete’ holes in the mesh. (The netting has already been painted with the Citadel grey acrylic ) The easiest way to thread the rope is to simply make a single drop of superglue on a card and just dip the first half an inch of the thread into it, quickly wipe off the excess, finger and thumb is fine if you’re quick and let it dry for a minute. Once dry you now have a length of rigging thread equipped with it’s own built in needle! Just thread the stiffened tip in and out of the mesh from one end to the other. (This method is also a must when rigging the block and tackles, the ‘needled’ thread is easy to pass through the blocks or deadeyes (as long as you have stuck a drill bit through those holes to ensure that they are clear first). Also in this photo is the first of the brass wire stanchions which also support the netting, one on each side in the middle. This one has also been blacken-it-ed.
Using the card template again to give me the height for the supporting rope, I drilled a small hole into the gap between the curving head timber and the roundhouse. The port side was a right so and so as there WAS no gap, so I was forced to drill directly into the metal of the ‘house and head timber joint, the starboard side did have a tiny gap into the wood behind – much easier, so much easier in fact that the rotary drill chuck almost followed the drill bit into the hull as it passed through the hull much faster than I was expecting.
With the little holes in place at the right height, the superglue trick was performed on the end of the rope and the stiffened end was tweezered back in to the hole and superglued in place. Once secure, the netting was gently run back along the rope until it fitted into the corner snugly and then the forward end was tied around the head timber to fix the front end. Note! To be absolutely authentic, that front end should be secured to a small bolt in the head timber but that bronzey metal is an absolute nightmare to drill into so I settled for a simpler tied off appearance. (The whole lot had been shot away before Victory ever reached the enemy battle line so who’s to say!!)BigGrin When the netting was safely in place, the stanchion (I had already drilled it’s locating hole into the deck before the netting went on) was threaded down through the mesh and into the deck. The shaft was made longer than it should be deliberately. When it was in position it could be seen sticking out under the head timbers so I could then very gently push it down a further quarter of an inch, snip it off level with the head timber and then push it back up for a nice neat finish. Also note in photo 7, the far side netting has got its stanchion, the near side hadn’t when I took the photo!
Photo 8 is the same bit from a lower angle whilst Photo 6 above it shows the Knightsheads in place earlier on. They weren’t glued in yet so I could get them out of the way for the netting. Also the starboard front support for the Marine’s Walk (the one which came off is still missing in this pic, (it is back in place now though).
That’s it for now, I’m just working on the main mast stay supports which pass through the Marine’s Walk at the moment, VERY fiddly so some more pics to follow soon.

Happy (cooler) building to All

Robin


Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Continuing on the bow Pt1 pic1.JPG
Continuing on the bow Pt2 pic2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#236 Posted : 25 July 2013 21:24:34

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionMember of the Year award: Member of the Year award
Groups: Tech Support, registriert, Registered

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 4,974
Points: 14,982
Location: Aberdeen
Hi Robin, more superb work and beautifully described....Cool Cool .. Think your restoration diary is as good as the build itself, simply wonderful.....Drool Love Drool Love Drool ... Very well done....

Regards

Alan
Diary Index - (SOTS) - http://forum.model-space...;m=58478&#post58478
Present Build
HMS SOTS - Mantua's RMS Titanic - San Francisco II
Subscribed to
HMS Vic - Santísima Trinidad - HMS Hood - Cutty Sark - Yamato

http://www.model-space.com/gb/
sparks
#237 Posted : 25 July 2013 21:58:04

Rank: Vicemaster


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: New Members

Joined: 01/04/2013
Posts: 312
Points: 939
Location: Essex
Nicely done, as usual, Robin ThumpUp ThumpUp
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Plymouth57
#238 Posted : 28 July 2013 20:55:26

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: New Members

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 970
Points: 2,914
Location: Plympton
Thanks again to the Alans!

Just a quickie for now, I'm working on the main stay rigging connector which passes down through the Knightsheads at the moment. In order to proceed on this part it was necessary to create the actual rigging blocks (or Hearts as they are actually called) from scratch, there are commercial versions available but not many to the 1/100 scale that I need and as usual, money is not exactly growing on my tree at the moment!
The photo page showing the construction of the two types of Heart is self explanitory so I won't add anything here except to say they are a lot more fiddly to make than the pics suggest! BigGrin
The main stay section is completed now and I'll post the pics up soon. Before then however here's a couple of photos to illustrate a new product that I thought I'd try out - namely the Humbrol Enamel Wash. I only came across this a few days ago when I was searching ebay to see if Humbrol still made their reels of white rigging thread. I've had a couple of reels of this for many years but never used it as it always appeared too white compared to the Constructo 'natural' coloured thread. I have been using it now however for the gun port lid tackle and just wondered if it was still made, apparently not, according to the search!
Anyway, I came across this enamel wash range which looked very interesting and the video of it being used to 'inlay' the panel lines on a model jet was awe inspiring, just touch a thin brush tip to the panel and the wash literally flowed along the line on its own. I managed to find the stuff in the local model shop and got a pot of the dark brown to try it on the wales to see if it would improve the '3D' effect in conjunction with the already applied highlight drybrushing.
As you can see from the before and after pictures, the effect is quite good, it needs a little cleaning up and re-highlighting but I think I'll definately be using it on the rest of the hull. It's £3.99 a pot and will last for years at the rate it is applied, comes in a large range of colours literally from black to white with browns, greys, sands, rust, oil, greens and lots more. See what you think!

Back Soon

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Enamel Wash Trial pic 1.JPG
Enamel Wash Trial pic 2.JPG
Main Stay Hearts pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
karl josef
#239 Posted : 28 July 2013 21:31:30

Rank: Pro


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: registriert

Joined: 01/01/2013
Posts: 126
Points: 390
Location: Germany
good work Cool
Best regards,
Reiner
sparks
#240 Posted : 28 July 2013 21:32:13

Rank: Vicemaster


Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: New Members

Joined: 01/04/2013
Posts: 312
Points: 939
Location: Essex
Nice hearts Robin ThumpUp
The effect of that wash is pretty good too.
I use washes on my AMV models, but never thought of applying it to Victory, may have to give it a try.
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Users browsing this topic
Guest (2)
20 Pages «<1011121314>»
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 1.148 seconds.
DeAgostini